Ocean Hermit – sailing, solitude and stories

My plans to retrace Captain Cook's unfinished voyage have been postponed a year while I work on the next Marine Diesel Basics book and get my new boat SV Oceandrifter ready for sea.

* Sailboat of dreams (4) – “Irie” of Eliza Is., USA

The skipper’s advice to others is, “Enjoy yourself, it’s later than you think.”  He bought ‘Irie” when she was derelict, restored her and sailed to the South Pacific – proof you don’t a fancy boat to get out there!

I have not yet been able to discover any photos of “Irie” but this news of the boat was posted in 2007  from the Marquesas in French Polynesia:

Considering that they’re still in their mid-30s, both Christian and Poki already have a lot of adventures under their belts. Christian has had the cruising bug ever since he accepted an offer to crew from Jamaica to Panama aboard the Dufour 31 Waterhoen, back in 1992. The next year he rejoined the boat in New Zealand for a loop up to Vanuatu and down to Australia. Somewhere out there he met Poki, who is English. They did a South Paciic circuit together, toured New Zealand and returned to the U.S., broke but happy. “We got married, found Irie as an un?nished, forgotten project, rusted through on deck and sinking on the hard, bought her for a song in ’97 and we’ve been preparing for this trip ever since.” They set sail from Washington state in ’03, doing a shakedown trip to Alaska before heading south to Mexico. Now, they intend to reach New Zealand by the end of the season. Advice to others: “Enjoy yourself, it’s later than you think.”

Christian and his English wife Poki met during previous South Pacific travels, fell in love and eventually returned to the States broke, but happy. Prior to jumping off from La Paz, they explained, “We got married, found Irie as an unfinished, forgotten project, rusted through on deck and sinking on the hard, bought her for a song in ’97, and we’ve been preparing for this trip ever since.” Goes to show you don’t have to have a gold-plated yacht to make it to ‘paradise’.

[album: http://dennisonberwick.info/wp-content/plugins/dm-albums/dm-albums.php?currdir=/wp-content/uploads/dm-albums/Tah – Irie/]

The Tahitiana is a “granddaughter” of the famous lifeboat built in the 19th century by Colin Archer to serve the Norwegian fishing fleet in the North Atlantic in winter time. This design of “double-ender” is renown for being seaworthy and seakindly even in atrocious weather, though she needs a fair amount of wind to sail well into the wind. There are many Tahitianas around the world – and many have made circumnavigations.

In the interest of encouraging owners to share their experiences and knowledge with other owners and people interested in this robust design, I’ll be posting photo albums of Tahitianas I meet at anchor, along the dock and on the internet.

If you have any information about this boat or other Tahitianas please let me know.

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This entry was posted on March 7, 2010 by in Sailboats, Sailing and tagged , , , .
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